via the Village Voice: ‘Arresting Images: Richard Ross…’
The Juvenile-in-Justice exhibition at Ronald Feldman Gallery received a lovely review in the Village Voice. Robert Shuster writes, “The understated display here (the unframed images are simply pinned to the wall) pulls you close, face-to-face with troubled kids. Their own words, recorded by Ross in interviews, appear on text panels—stories of family strife, confessions of guilt, and a doleful resignation to a vast, often harsh system that doesn’t offer anyone much chance for rehab. Ross’s compositions capture that quiet misery.”
Read the review HERE.

 

via NY Times: ‘True Believers in Justice’

In this NY Times Op-Doc The filmmaker Dawn Porter follows Travis Williams, a young public defender in the Deep South, who struggles against long hours, low pay and staggering caseloads to bring justice to all. A heartening recognition of the important, sometimes thankless work performed every day in the U.S by Public Defenders in a system that unfairly targets the impoverished, the uneducated, and the minority.

Watch the video and read the article by the filmmaker HERE. 

 

Save Our Streets Crown Heights Rally. Image courtesy of https://www.facebook.com/soscrownheights?fref=ts
Save Our Streets Crown Heights Rally. Image courtesy of https://www.facebook.com/soscrownheights?fref=ts
 

via the Crime Report: ‘Interrupting Violence’ 

Looking at a new study by the Center for Court Innovation on the impact of Save our Streets, a community-based effort to end gun violence in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, NY. Crime Report writes that during the 29-month study period, the Save Our Streets staff “reported mediating more than 100 potentially violent street conflicts involving more than 1,000 individuals.”

Read the study HERE and Read the Crime Report’s coverage HERE
 

Artwork created as part of the Suspension Stories Project by youth within Alternatives' Connect Force Program in Chicago. Courtesy of Flikr user pipelineart3.
Courtesy of Flikr user pipelineart3, at http://www.flickr.com/photos/54927386@N06/5089094146/
 
The art above was created as part of the Suspension Stories Project. On July 31st, the YWAT and Project NIA hosted the Representing the Pipeline event at Alternatives Inc. in Chicago. A number of youth who were part of Alternatives’ Connect Force Program along with other youth talked about the school to prison pipeline. They then created art pieces to illustrate the pipeline.
 
via In These Times: ‘Prison Prep School’

Assistant editor Rebecca Burns looks at the school-to-prison pipeline in Chicago. “My high school seemed like its own personal prison,” stated Edward Ward a graduate of the Orr Academy on Chicago’s West Side where metal detectors, security guards and an on-campus police processing center were all a part of his high school experience…

Read the article HERE. 

 

via the New York Times Magazine: ‘The Price of a Stolen Childhood’

An extensive and powerful piece in this week’s NY Times Magazine on the ability of restitution to help victims of child pornography. The story follows two young women as they painfully navigate life, school, and therapy after discovering that images of themselves had been circulating on the internet for years. Through the lens of these young, interrupted lives the piece examines the history of sentencing and punishment in child pornography cases and the future of restitution for all victims.

Read the article HERE. 

 

via the NY Times 6th Floor Blog: A Discussion ‘Does the Concept of Forgiveness Have a Place in the Courtroom?’ 

In the wake of Paul Tullis’ article last week on restorative justice (Link to article HERE) and the subsequent explosion of comments on both sides of the concept, the NY Times staff has set up a discussion on the 6th Floor Blog and invites readers to respond to the question in the comments section.

Join the discussion HERE. 
 

 

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The Short list is published weekly on Friday mornings and is comprised of a brief list of juvenile justice and justice related links to articles, reports, videos and more that are worth a look/read.