[Highlights from the week’s juvenile justice and justice related articles, reports, videos and more that are worth your time.]  
via NY Times: ‘Who is Poor?’
There are three ways of defining poverty. This op-ed piece explores all three while positing that “the lack of definition in our definition of poverty is part of the problem; it helps to answer the question of how the richest country in the history of the world could have so many people living in a state of deprivation.”
Read the op-ed HERE

 
via Youthprise: ‘JDAI Black History Month Video’ 

 
 via Juvenile Justice Information Exchange: ‘A House of Art Offering Inner-City Youth A Way Out’

Miguel Rodriguez, director of the Graffiti Zone, sitting outside the program’s home. Photo by Samantha Caiola, courtesy of JJIE.org
Miguel Rodriguez, director of the Graffiti Zone, sitting outside the program’s home. Photo by Samantha Caiola, courtesy of JJIE.org

Samantha Caiola introduces us to Graffiti Zone, a Chicago non-profit providing young people with the space and guidance to produce legal graffiti, sound mixing and slam poetry. Run by a 20-year-old Chicago native, Graffiti Zone aims to keep youth away from street gangs while beautifying the city.

Read the article HERE

via the Crime Report: ‘Chasing Gidgeon’
Yesterday was the 50th anniversary of a Supreme Court ruling, Gideon vs. Wainwright, that every American was constitutionally entitled to a lawyer in a criminal trial, regardless of his or her ability to pay. Nevertheless, every year thousands of poor Americans are denied that right through underfunded systems and questionable practices. The Crime Report interviews Karen Houppert, a Baltimore journalist whose new book ‘Chasing Gideon’ explores the way justice is delivered and denied to the poor.
Read the interview HERE
Buy Chasing Gideon HERE

 
Film to watch out for: ’12 O’Clock Boys’ 

Making its worldwide premier last week at South by South West in Austin, Texas, ’12 O’Clock Boys’ is a new documentary film which follows a group of young men who ride dirt bikes on the streets of Baltimore. This past time is dangerous to both the riders and pedestrians, and thus the police have made significant efforts to catch and confiscate the bikes of these riders. A review of the movie on JJIE sums up the chain of events as follows: “The result is an escalation of conflict — the bikers taunt the police, the police respond with shows of force, the bikers become more defiant, the police crack down even harder, and on and on with no indication that either side is ready to compromise or even negotiate with the other.” Nathan Lofty, the movie’s filmmaker didn’t intend for the movie to be political but rather to take an inside look at a subculture that is attracting young boys and men in Baltimore. Maybe a little bit of both?

Watch the trailer below and at the website here as well as find a screening near you

 
 

[The Short List is published on Tuesday mornings and features highlights from the week’s juvenile justice and justice related articles, reports, videos and more that are worth your time.]
 

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