• [Family-in-Justice] Cheryle and her grandson Anthony Part 2 [Read Part 1 HERE]     Cheryle:   Sometimes I wish we had left the country. We had that weekend, we could have run away. But we had no idea. We knew he was innocent. We went on vacation. We were so naïve. I used to believe in the system. Now I am angry with […] March 27, 2013
  • M.B, age 17, gets all As I’ve been here 4 months. I’ve been to the juvenile detention center five times. The first time was theft, the second, shoplifting, the third, possession of controlled substances, the fourth, violation of parole, and the fifth, violation of parole and felony possession of marijuana with intent to distribute. I’m in the 12th grade and get […] July 3, 2012
  • T.F, age 17, Juvenile Detention Center, Houston, Texas I’m here just shy of one year. I hope they send me home or put me on probation. I’m in the 11th grade. This has been my first time here, I’m here for aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon, but I didn’t do it. I came in at the end of something happening, and my […] June 21, 2012
  • M.C, age 16, Juvenile Detention Center, Houston, Texas I’ve been here two and a half months. Before I was in Gulf Coast Training for burglary of habitation. It was my first felony, my first offense. I was with my friends. I was the getaway driver. One went to Leadership Academy; another went to an adult facility. I live with my grandmother. I’ve been […] June 19, 2012
  • I looked for love and acceptance everywhere. I’m going to be 18 in 2 weeks. I have been here one year and one month. I am here for criminal trespassing as well as sex offenses. I’ve done a lot of counseling by myself and with my family– I have four sisters and three brothers, and I live with my grandmother. This place […] June 14, 2012
  • “No talking, hands behind your back, eyes down.” Boys lined up at the Burnett-Bayland Reception Center in Houston, Texas. This is part of the normal check-in here. A significant portion of the history of juvenile incarceration in Texas involves boot camps. The process of transitioning from this quasi-military style to a more restorative, dignified practices, takes about 10 years. The Center was originally […] June 5, 2012
  • “My possessions? I’m wearing them.” Some kids arrive at institutions after living on the street with the clothes on their back–nothing more. The tragedy is when juveniles are released from custody or treatment and they are dropped off at the only place that will take them, a shelter. This does happen. December 19, 2011
  • Comparative Uniforms Both sets of juveniles in the images above are in residential treatment programs. Missouri (top) allows them to dress in casual clothing; Massachusetts (below) has them wearing scarlet jump suits. December 16, 2011
  • Cross Creek Residential Treatment I was a Gangbanger. My Mother is in the Police Academy and lives with her girlfriend. My dad died. I have an uncle who was in prison for a while. No big deal. December 15, 2011
  • Couch Potato, Missouri I’ve been in SEC (Soaring Eagles Cottage) two years for armed robbery. We get to wear whatever clothes we want. Yeah, my philosophy is you should ALWAYS give someone another chance.  December 13, 2011
  • Wilderness Camp, St. George, Utah   I was brought here by transporters–been here 13 days. I have to wear this red jumpsuit because I’m a “flight risk.” December 8, 2011
  • Uniformity The clothes make the man.  This adage is even more important for teenagers, whose identity, or lack of same, is defined by their clothing. The language of the clothing here is punitive, humiliating and dehumanizing. It is a billboard that says,  “I screwed up.” December 7, 2011